Monday, June 2, 2014

Knowing What's Growing: Calibrachoa







Last year I discovered a new flower that I had never seen before: Calibrachoa. I found it in a hanging basket at Lowe's garden center and was smitten. I knew nothing about it, but couldn't leave without taking one home that day. Well, I guess I COULD have gone home without one, but I really didn't want to.

With its trailing, petunia-like tiny flowers, Calibrachoa makes a gorgeous choice for long-lasting blooms all season long.

Calibrachoa is also known as "million bells" for the masses of little bell-shaped flowers the plant produces continuously throughout the growing season. And, I even found these little flowers referred to as "trailing petunias", which makes perfect sense. They look amazingly like tiny petunias, and have a strong trailing habit.

With its trailing, petunia-like tiny flowers, Calibrachoa makes a gorgeous choice for long-lasting blooms all season long.

 Native to South America, Calibrachoa is a hybrid plant introduced to North America in the early 1990's. The profusion of brightly colored flowers can be found in blue, pink, lavender, coral, yellow, white, red, or bronze. Officially an annual plant, I discovered that it is actually a tender perennial in our zone 8 garden. While doing some research on this flower, I learned that they are considered winter hardy in zones 9-11. Apparently zone 8 works too.

With its trailing, petunia-like tiny flowers, Calibrachoa makes a gorgeous choice for long-lasting blooms all season long.

As last summer was winding down, I transplanted them from the hanging basket to the barrel that our Don Juan climbing rose grows in. They didn't even seem to notice the new location and settled in nicely for the fall/winter. This spring they began sporting their bright blooms again, and I added a couple of purple ones to the collection.

With its trailing, petunia-like tiny flowers, Calibrachoa makes a gorgeous choice for long-lasting blooms all season long.

Calibrachoa enjoys moist, well-drained, organically-rich soil and plenty of sunlight. In areas with intense heat (read HERE), some shade is good. Although I have not yet seen any in our garden, these charming flowers are described as hummingbird attractors. And, one of my favorite features is that they require no deadheading, making it much easier to keep them looking nice all season.

With its trailing, petunia-like tiny flowers, Calibrachoa makes a gorgeous choice for long-lasting blooms all season long.

If you are looking for an easy-care splash of color for your garden, Calibrachoa is one I would recommend checking into. Enjoy the growing season!

Have you heard of Calibrachoa? Are you already growing it in your garden?

This post may be linked at these great parties.

16 comments:

  1. They are gorgeous flowers. I have not heard of this variety before! Thank you for the post!
    Kathy

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    1. Thanks for visiting Kathy. I'm enjoying your link party and look forward to visiting often.

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  2. These are so pretty! I love that they don't require deadheading. I would have to grow them as an annual in my zone - but they would be pretty in summer!

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    1. You probably would! :(
      We did experiment with some true annuals here last winter. We brought them in over winter (geranium, vinca, and angelonia) and they all survived and are back in the garden. The verdict is still out whether they will do as well as new annuals, but it was a fun experiment.
      Thanks for visiting Susan. It's always nice to see your smiling face. :)

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  3. Wow, I just had to pop over when I saw your pic! This is really pretty.... I would love for you to share it at the Home Sweet Garden Party!

    See the post here ---->>>http://creativecountrymom.blogspot.com/2014/06/home-sweet-garden-party-63.html

    xxx....Brooke

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    1. Thank you Brooke for stopping by. I would love to share at your party. Thanks! :)

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  4. I absolutely have to have one of these now! It's gorgeous. The fact that they are hummingbird attractors is what's making me run to the local flower shop today!!! Thanks for sharing

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    1. Hi Madeline,
      I'm so glad you like them! I'd love to hear what color you choose and how they grow for you. I hope you attract some hummers with them too! Thanks for visiting. Have a beautiful day.

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  5. There are beautiful. I've seen them but never knew what they were. I'll have to see if they would thrive where we live. I've promised my daughter that we can plant a flower garden and I think she would fall apart over these. Again, thanks for sharing on Merry Monday Linky party.

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    1. Thanks Jade. They are truly an easy-care flower and would be great for little gardeners. I hope you can enjoy them. Thanks for hosting the party! I have a great time.

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  6. Beautiful! I love flowers. Pinned. Thanks for being a part of our party. Please join us tonight at 7 pm.. It's a honor to have you! http://loulougirls.blogspot.com
    Happy Monday! Lou Lou Girls

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    1. Thank you Kimberly. I love your party - and your blog - and look forward to joining again this week!

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  7. You have the prettiest flowers and such a green thumb, Karen! Thanks for sharing with us at the Creative Ways Link Party! Hope you are having a great week so far.
    Blessings,
    Nici

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    1. Thanks for visiting Nici. These flowers are so easy - no green thumb required! :)
      You have a great week too!

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  8. Your flowers are lovely. Thank you for sharing their beauty with us at Wake Up Wednesday Linky Party. I just love all the soft beautiful colors of this flower.
    Hugs
    Angel

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    1. Thank you Angel for your sweet comments. And thanks for hosting your party. I enjoyed linking up with you and look forward to joining again. Have a beautiful weekend!

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